£100 of Bitcoins in 2010 would be worth £4.3million today ...

Your Gateway to the Internet of Value

Blockchain.io, Your Gateway to the Internet of Value. Blockchain.io is a project from Paymium.com, the longest standing bitcoin exchange in the world since 2010.
[link]

The first-EVER mention of bitcoin's value "going to the moon" back in 2010 when price was only $0.06.

The first-EVER mention of bitcoin's value submitted by Blockfolio to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The first-ever mention of bitcoin's value "going to the moon" back in 2010 on BitcoinTalk, it was only $0.06.

The first-ever mention of bitcoin's value submitted by Blockfolio to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The first-EVER mention of bitcoin's value "going to the moon" back in 2010 when price was only $0.06.

The first-EVER mention of bitcoin's value submitted by scgco to GGCrypto [link] [comments]

In honor of Bitcoin Cash independence day, a quote from Gavin Andresen: "Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange." 💸💸

In honor of Bitcoin Cash independence day, a quote from Gavin Andresen: submitted by BitcoinXio to btc [link] [comments]

Gavin Andresen on Twitter: Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange.

Gavin Andresen on Twitter: Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange. submitted by kostialevin to btc [link] [comments]

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million submitted by tibm2sc to todayilearned [link] [comments]

In honor of Bitcoin Cash independence day, a quote from Gavin Andresen: "Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange." 💸💸

In honor of Bitcoin Cash independence day, a quote from Gavin Andresen: submitted by vegasbooty to Cryptoandme [link] [comments]

Huge market rally for Bitcoins this morning: 10,000 Bitcoins bought a programmer 2 pizzas in May 2010... this morning same coins value of $1.9 million US.

Huge market rally for Bitcoins this morning: 10,000 Bitcoins bought a programmer 2 pizzas in May 2010... this morning same coins value of $1.9 million US. submitted by philosoraptor45 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Gavin Andresen on Twitter: Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange.

Gavin Andresen on Twitter: Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange. submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

The value in USD of those 2 pizzas bought in 2010 as I write this = 10K BTC = $27,949,100 USD /r/Bitcoin

The value in USD of those 2 pizzas bought in 2010 as I write this = 10K BTC = $27,949,100 USD /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Satoshi Nakamoto's Successor Gavin Andreson Endorses Bitcoin Cash: "Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AND means of exchange." /r/BitcoinMarkets

Satoshi Nakamoto's Successor Gavin Andreson Endorses Bitcoin Cash: submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Gavin Andresen on Twitter: Bitcoin Cash is what I started working on in 2010: a store of value AN...

The following post by WolfOfThe6ix is being replicated because the post has been silently greylisted.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7cahc1
The original post's content was as follows:
[removed]
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

/u/lifeboatz responds to: TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million [+32]

submitted by ModisDead to goodlongposts [link] [comments]

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million submitted by unremovable to unremovable [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million /r/todayilearned

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million /todayilearned submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million - todayilearned

TIL In 2010, a Bitcoiner named Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10 000 BTC (about $25 at that time) for two pizzas. Now the bitcoins have a value of $6,5 million - todayilearned submitted by Know_Your_Shit to knowyourshit [link] [comments]

TIL In may 2010, a pizza was sold for 10,000 BTC (bitcoin). Converted to today's value of USD, this pizza was sold for $4,788,300. - todayilearned

TIL In may 2010, a pizza was sold for 10,000 BTC (bitcoin). Converted to today's value of USD, this pizza was sold for $4,788,300. - todayilearned submitted by Know_Your_Shit to knowyourshit [link] [comments]

TIL In may 2010, a pizza was sold for 10,000 BTC (bitcoin). Converted to today's value of USD, this pizza was sold for $4,788,300.

TIL In may 2010, a pizza was sold for 10,000 BTC (bitcoin). Converted to today's value of USD, this pizza was sold for $4,788,300. submitted by unremovable to unremovable [link] [comments]

What r/fatFIRE can learn from the book, Psychology of Money

My favorite author, Morgan Housel, released his new book, The Psychology of Money, last week. In the book, Housel discussed many interesting psychological phenomenon, through the lens of finance. As I flipped through the pages, I started to realize so much of what's happening in fatFIRE are examples of what's discussed in the book.
No One's Crazy
The book begins with how your personal experiences with money make up maybe 0.000000001% of what's happened in the world, but maybe 80% of how you think the world works.
For example, if you were born in 1970, the S&P 500 increased almost 10-fold, adjusted for inflation, during your teens and 20s. That's an amazing return. If you were born in 1950, the market went literally nowhere in your teens and 20s adjusted for inflation. Two groups of people, separated by chance of their birth year, go through life with a completely different view on how the stock market works.
Takeaways for fatFIRE:
When you read other posts and comments about what stocks to buy, what startups to join, what's the economy going to be like, what's the best asset allocation, etc., remember that is just a single person's point of view. That person may be from a different generation, earns different incomes, upholds different values, keeps different jobs, and has different degrees of luck.
And remember, don't be mean to others. A view about money that one group of people thinks is outrageous can make perfect sense to another.
Luck & Risk
The next chapter discusses the big role luck and risk plays in someone's life. Luck and risk are two sides of the same coin.
Examples from the book: Countless fortunes (and mistakes) owe their outcomes to leverage. The best (and worst) managers drive their employees as hard as they can. "The customers are always right" and "customers don't know what they want" are both accepted business wisdom. The line between "inspiringly bold" and "foolishly reckless" can be a millimeter thick and only visible with hindsight. Risk and luck are doppelgängers.
Takeaways for fatFIRE:
Be careful who you praise and admire. That commenter who joined a unicorn at Series A may look like a genius on the outside, but they may just be lucky and cannot repeat it again.
Be careful who you look down upon and wish to avoid becoming. That poster who joined WeWork may look like a fool, but they made the best decision based on the information they had at a time. They took a risk and got unlucky.
Therefore, focus less on specific individuals and case studies and more on broad patterns.
Furthermore, when things are going extremely well, realize it's not as good as you think -- like the stock market right now.
On the other hand, we should forgive ourselves and leave room for understanding when judging failures -- like the stock market in March.
Never Enough
The hardest financial skill is getting the goalpost to stop moving. It gets dangerous when the taste of having more -- more money, more power, more prestige -- increases ambition faster than satisfaction.
Social comparison is the problem here. A rookie baseball players who earns $500k a year envies Mike Trout who has a 12-year, $430 million contract envies a hedge fund manager who makes $340 million a year envies Warren Buffett who had a $3.5 billion increase in fortune in 2018.
There are many things never worth risking, no matter the potential gain. Reputation is invaluable. Freedom and independence are invaluable. Friends and family are invaluable. Being loved by those who you want to love you is invaluable. Happiness is invaluable. And your best shot at keeping these things is knowing when it's time to stop taking risks that might harm them. Knowing when you have enough.
Takeaways for fatFIRE:
When you make a big gain, it's totally okay to take profit, as long as you keep your ambition down and acknowledge the possibility that it may go higher. If that happens, no need to play the would've should've could've game, because it very well might've gone the other way.
When you see someone who got 20x return on Shopify or bet big into Ethereum in 2016, remember they may envy the pre-IPO employees at Shopify or the genius who held Bitcoin since 2010.
At the end of the day, do not risk more than what's comfortable in your life for the sake of making huge amount of money, because even if you do make it, you may not find it worth it.
Tails, You Win
Skipping a few chapters to talk about the prominence of tail events.
At the Berkshire Hathaway shareholder meeting in 2013 Warren Buffet said he's owned 400 to 500 stocks during his life and made most of his money on 10 of them. Charlie Munger followed up: "If you remove just a few of Berkshire's top investments, its long-term track record is pretty average."
In 2018, Amazon drove 6% of the S&P 500's returns. And Amazon's growth is almost entirely due to Prime and Amazon Web Services, which itself are tail events in a company that has experimented with hundreds of products, from the Fire Phone to travel agencies.
Apple was responsible for almost 7% of the index's returns in 2018. And it is driven overwhelmingly by the iPhone, which in the world of tech products is as tail--y as tails get.
And who's working at these companies? Google's hiring acceptance rate if 0.2%. Facebook's is 0.1%. Apple's is about 2%. So the people working on these tail projects that drive tail returns have tail careers.
Takeaways for fatFIRE:
When we pay special attention to a role model's successes we overlook that their gains came from a small percent of their actions. That makes our own failures, losses, and setbacks feel like we're doing something wrong.
When you accept that tails drive everything is business, investing and finance you will realize that it's normal for lots of things to go wrong, break, fail and fall. If you are a good stock picker you'll be right maybe half the time. If you're a good business leader maybe half of your product and strategy ideas will work. If you're a good investor most years will be just OK, and plenty will be bad. If you're a good worker you'll find the right company in the right field after several attempts and trials. And that's if you're good.
Freedom
The highest form of wealth is the ability to wake up every morning and say "I can do whatever I want today." The ability to do what you want, when you want, with who you want, for as long as you want, is priceless. It is the highest dividend money pays.
Research has shown having a strong sense of controlling one's life is a more dependable predictor of positive feelings of wellbeing than any of the objective conditions of life we have considered.
People like to feel like they're in control -- in the drivers' seat. When we try to get them to do something, they feel disempowered. Rather than feeling like they made the choice, they feel like we made it for them. So they say no or do something else, even when they might have originally been happy to go along.
Takeaways for fatFIRE:
Most of you probably are working thought-based and decision job, your tool is your head, which never leaves you. You might be thinking about your project during your commute, as you're making dinner, while you put your kids to sleep, and when you wake up stressed at three in the morning. You might be on the clock for fewer hours than you would in 1050. But it feels like you're working 24/7.
If this feels like you, and you do not like it, it is totally fine to switch to a job that pays less but gives you more freedom and independence, because freedom and independence are what FatFire is all about.
---
I'm only half way into the book, but I can tell this will be one of the best finance book of 2020. If you guys find this useful, happy to come back next week with more insights once I've gotten to the end. I like talking about these things on Twitter too.
Edit: here's part 2 and here's a Twitter thread of the best snippets
submitted by uDontLifeForBeSad to fatFIRE [link] [comments]

What r/investing can learn from the book, Psychology of Money

My favorite author, Morgan Housel, released his new book, The Psychology of Money, last week. In the book, Housel discussed many interesting psychological phenomenon, through the lens of finance. As I flipped through the pages, I started to realize so much of what's happening in investing are examples of what's discussed in the book.
No One's Crazy
The book begins with how your personal experiences with money make up maybe 0.000000001% of what's happened in the world, but maybe 80% of how you think the world works.
For example, if you were born in 1970, the S&P 500 increased almost 10-fold, adjusted for inflation, during your teens and 20s. That's an amazing return. If you were born in 1950, the market went literally nowhere in your teens and 20s adjusted for inflation. Two groups of people, separated by chance of their birth year, go through life with a completely different view on how the stock market works.
Takeaways for investing:
When you read other posts and comments about what stocks to buy, when to sell, what's likely to happen next, what's the best asset allocation, etc., remember that is just a single person's point of view. That person may be from a different generation, earns different incomes, upholds different values, keeps different jobs, and has different degrees of luck.
And remember, don't be mean to others. A view about money that one group of people thinks is outrageous can make perfect sense to another.
Luck & Risk
The next chapter discusses the big role luck and risk plays in someone's life. Luck and risk are two sides of the same coin.
Examples from the book: Countless fortunes (and mistakes) owe their outcomes to leverage. The best (and worst) managers drive their employees as hard as they can. "The customers are always right" and "customers don't know what they want" are both accepted business wisdom. The line between "inspiringly bold" and "foolishly reckless" can be a millimeter thick and only visible with hindsight. Risk and luck are doppelgängers.
Takeaways for investing:
Be careful who you praise and admire. That commenter who bought $SHOP at $30 may look like a genius on the outside, but they may just be lucky and cannot repeat it again.
Be careful who you look down upon and wish to avoid becoming. That poster who put a bull argument for Luckin Coffee may look like a fool, but they made the best decision based on the information they had at a time. They took a risk and got unlucky.
Therefore, focus less on specific individuals and case studies and more on broad patterns.
Furthermore, when things are going extremely well, realize it's not as good as you think -- like the stock market right now.
On the other hand, we should forgive ourselves and leave room for understanding when judging failures -- like the stock market in March.
Never Enough
The hardest financial skill is getting the goalpost to stop moving. It gets dangerous when the taste of having more -- more money, more power, more prestige -- increases ambition faster than satisfaction.
Social comparison is the problem here. A rookie baseball players who earns $500k a year envies Mike Trout who has a 12-year, $430 million contract envies a hedge fund manager who makes $340 million a year envies Warren Buffett who had a $3.5 billion increase in fortune in 2018.
There are many things never worth risking, no matter the potential gain. Reputation is invaluable. Freedom and independence are invaluable. Friends and family are invaluable. Being loved by those who you want to love you is invaluable. Happiness is invaluable. And your best shot at keeping these things is knowing when it's time to stop taking risks that might harm them. Knowing when you have enough.
Takeaways for investing:
When you make a big gain, it's totally okay to take profit, as long as you keep your ambition down and acknowledge the possibility that it may go higher. If that happens, no need to play the would've should've could've game, because it very well might've gone the other way.
When you see someone who got 20x return on Amazon or bet big into Ethereum in 2016, remember they may envy the pre-IPO employees at Amazon or the genius who held Bitcoin since 2010.
At the end of the day, do not risk more than what's comfortable in your life for the sake of making huge amount of money, because even if you do make it, you may not find it worth it.
Tails, You Win
Skipping a few chapters to talk about the prominence of tail events.
At the Berkshire Hathaway shareholder meeting in 2013 Warren Buffet said he's owned 400 to 500 stocks during his life and made most of his money on 10 of them. Charlie Munger followed up: "If you remove just a few of Berkshire's top investments, its long-term track record is pretty average."
In 2018, Amazon drove 6% of the S&P 500's returns. And Amazon's growth is almost entirely due to Prime and Amazon Web Services, which itself are tail events in a company that has experimented with hundreds of products, from the Fire Phone to travel agencies.
Apple was responsible for almost 7% of the index's returns in 2018. And it is driven overwhelmingly by the iPhone, which in the world of tech products is as tail--y as tails get.
And who's working at these companies? Google's hiring acceptance rate if 0.2%. Facebook's is 0.1%. Apple's is about 2%. So the people working on these tail projects that drive tail returns have tail careers.
Takeaways for investing:
When we pay special attention to a role model's successes we overlook that their gains came from a small percent of their actions. That makes our own failures, losses, and setbacks feel like we're doing something wrong.
When you accept that tails drive everything is business, investing and finance you will realize that it's normal for lots of things to go wrong, break, fail and fall. If you are a good stock picker you'll be right maybe half the time. If you're a good business leader maybe half of your product and strategy ideas will work. If you're a good investor most years will be just OK, and plenty will be bad. If you're a good worker you'll find the right company in the right field after several attempts and trials. And that's if you're good.
Freedom
The highest form of wealth is the ability to wake up every morning and say "I can do whatever I want today." The ability to do what you want, when you want, with who you want, for as long as you want, is priceless. It is the highest dividend money pays.
Research has shown having a strong sense of controlling one's life is a more dependable predictor of positive feelings of wellbeing than any of the objective conditions of life we have considered.
People like to feel like they're in control -- in the drivers' seat. When we try to get them to do something, they feel disempowered. Rather than feeling like they made the choice, they feel like we made it for them. So they say no or do something else, even when they might have originally been happy to go along.
Takeaways for investing:
If your job is a thought-based and decision job, your tool is your head, which never leaves you. You might be thinking about your project during your commute, as you're making dinner, while you put your kids to sleep, and when you wake up stressed at three in the morning. You might be on the clock for fewer hours than you would in 1050. But it feels like you're working 24/7.
If this feels like you, and you do not like it, it is totally fine to switch to a job that pays less but gives you more freedom and independence, because freedom and independence are ultimate form of wealth.
---
I'm only half way into the book, but I can tell this will be one of the best finance book of 2020. If you guys find this useful, happy to come back next week with more insights once I've gotten to the end.
submitted by uDontLifeForBeSad to investing [link] [comments]

[WTS] PREMIUM SILVER ROUNDS, unique items


PRICES UPDATED
SILVER SPOT: $24.60/oz (for my reference)
PM PLEASE, PM PLEASE
Through this weekend, I will use this post to list many different premium silver rounds (kooks, goats, swans, 2010 brits, phils, privateer, other) and some unique items. So check back for updates.

To start, offered is:

2016 China 30 gram Silver Pandas BU (In Capsules) — $30/ea (APMEX PRICE $36.82/ea)
https://imgur.com/a/07X9l3o (Panda Proof)

Rolls of premium rounds (20 per roll) in capsules and wrap (only selling by the roll for now)
2014 x 2 Australia 1 oz Silver Kookaburra BU -- $620/roll (APMEX PRICE $38.70/ea)
2015 x 2 Australia 1 oz Silver Kookaburra BU -- $620/roll (APMEX PRICE $38.70/ea)
2017 x 4 Australia 1 oz Silver Kookaburra BU -- $620/roll (APMEX PRICE $38.70/ea)
2019 x 2 Australia 1 oz Silver Swan BU — $840/roll (APMEX PRICE $54.70/ea)
2015 x 5 Australia 1 oz Silver Lunar Goat BU (Series II) — $640/roll (APMEX PRICE $39.70/ea)
https://imgur.com/a/kBHTcR6 (kooks, swans, goat proof)

Keep calm and slave on rounds, 2010 Brittanias
2013 SBSS Slave Queen 1oz Rounds x 9 — $28/ea
2010 1oz Brittanias x 19. When is the last time you saw these? — $31/ea
https://imgur.com/a/QsGF6P7 (Slave Queen, Brits Proof)

2013 Northwest Territorial Mint 45 caliber 1 oz cartridges
Boxes of 10. All original packaging and COA. Sold only as boxes of 10. 2 available. — $370/ea (1 left)
https://imgur.com/a/EMcv4DA (45 caliber proof)


2 oz Silver Rounds Privateer Ultra High Relief Pirate Rounds .999 Fine Bullion
Privateer: No Prey, No Pay 2oz premium rounds x 10 — $70/ea
2 oz Silver UHR Round - Privateer Series: The Siren x 4 — $70/ea
https://imgur.com/a/LR2yEQh (Privateer Proof)


2013 1 oz Pegasus Silver Rounds
Pegasus 1oz x 10. Some are starting to show toning or have toning of edges — $29/ea
https://imgur.com/a/eCJLLBR (Pegasus Proof)

2019 Silver 1oz Austrian Philharmonics
Tubes of (20) 1oz Austrian Philharmonics. Selling by the tube for now. x 2 — $560/ea (findbullionprices.com best price $36.70/ea)
https://imgur.com/a/P1XPzCg (Phils Proof)

2015 Australian Funnel Web Spiders
(1) tube of 20 Funnel Spiders, 1oz ea — $580 (APMEX price $33.70/ea)
https://imgur.com/a/sSzZwRl (Funnel Spider Proof)

Classic Silver Lot (Engelhard 1oz bars, Swiss of America Rounds, A-mark 1oz bars)
Classic 1oz Engelhards x 16 -- $29/ea (APMEX price $34.70/ea) (2 remaining)
1 1974 Classic Swiss of America 1oz thick round -- $40 (APMEX price $49.71) (SOLD)
Classic 1981 A-mark 1oz bars x 5 — $29/ea (ALL SOLD)
https://imgur.com/a/7ojjoxA (Classic Lot Proof)

Other Silver Bar Lot (Scotties, others)
20 oz Scotty kitkat bar -- $560 (SOLD)
10oz Scotty stackers x 2 — $280/ea
Prospector’s Gold & Gems poured bars -- $27/oz (10 oz left)
5oz Bullion Stackers hexagonal pour — $145 (SOLD)
Classic 5oz toned Sunshine mining company bar (old bar predating Sunshine Mint) — $145
https://imgur.com/a/p8K4TtR (Other Silver Bar Proof)


5g Engelhard .9999 GOLD Bar — $340 (SOLD)
These are pretty hard to come by.
https://imgur.com/a/ajfwQAr (Engelhard Gold Proof)

1/10 oz 1994 Platinum Koala — $150 (SOLD)
https://imgur.com/a/xtVWEfE (Koala Proof)

5oz Great Panther Silver Limited Bar — $150
This one is scarce!!
https://imgur.com/a/cOm23xg (Panther proof)

Cross posted on other forums.
TERMS: All eligible items are verified with a sigma precious metal verifier. Prices are generally based on the underlying spot price. Large fluctuations in spot prices could affect the price of items listed. USPS first class starts @ $4 for up to 4oz, SFRB @ $8 for up to 60 oz, MFRB @ $16 for 60+ oz, signature @ $2.50. Will insure for 1.1% of purchase price. Shipping is at buyer’s risk. All items will be tracked unless otherwise stated. Would recommend delivery to a secure box for precious metals. Accept: Zelle, Venmo, Cash app, Bitcoin. NO PAYPAL. Other forms of payment will be considered.
I am not a coin grader. The condition of any coin listed is how it was listed when I acquired it. I will be more than happy to provide any detailed, unedited photos for any coin. Unless specifically mentioned, assume coins are in generally good condition. Noticeable defects potentially affecting the value will attempt to be noted. I try to price my items substantially below the lowest price I can find online from a national dealer. If you see a legitimate cheaper price, let me know and I may very well adjust my price. FYI, I am in Eastern time zone if I do not respond, may be sleeping.
submitted by AgAuSeller to Pmsforsale [link] [comments]

[WTS] Recent US Mint Platinum/Gold/Silver, Certified Pre-1933 Gold, Pandas, Lots of Nice Stuff

Prices are firm; however, I am willing to combine or eliminate shipping costs if you are buying more than one lot. "SPOT" refers to the melt value of the coin given the current spot price. FOR BITCOIN SALES I WILL KNOCK 1% OFF PRICE
I am also looking to trade for 1 oz carded gold bars. I would count those as 1 oz SPOT + $40 in trade value.
Verification: https://imgur.com/QtcEZ6e , https://imgur.com/hXj8EqB , https://imgur.com/a/9XLS5zL
For boxed stuff, all government packaging and COAs included.
Lot 1: 1985 1 oz 100 Yuan Gold Panda NGC MS68 - SPOT + $125 SHIPPED
Lot 2: 2001 1 oz 500 Yuan Gold Panda - SPOT + $110 SHIPPED (I wouldn't call this coin BU but it's OK)
Lot 3: 1892 $10 Gold Liberty NGC MS62 - $1050 SHIPPED
Lot 4: 1904 $20 Gold Liberty PCGS MS62 - $2130 SHIPPED
Lot 5: 1873 $20 Gold Liberty NGC AU50 - $2175 SHIPPED
Lot 6: 2015 $100 Ultra High Relief Proof Liberty - $2150 SHIPPED
Lot 7: 2017 1 oz Gold $100 Ultra High Relief Proof Liberty - $2150 SHIPPED
Lot 8: 2020 BU Basketball Hall of Fame $5 Gold (0.2419 oz AGW) - $590 SHIPPED
Lot 9: 2020 Proof Basketball Hall of Fame $5 Gold (0.2419 oz AGW) - $590 SHIPPED
Lot 10: 2016 1/10 oz 24K Gold Mercury Dime - $280 SHIPPED (1 of 3 SOLD, 2 LEFT)
Lot 11: 2016 1/4 oz 24K Standing Liberty Quarter Gold - $560 SHIPPED
Lot 12: 2018 1/10 oz High Relief Gold Liberty Proof - $245 SHIPPED (1 of 3 SOLD, 2 LEFT)
Lot 13: 2014 BU Baseball Hall of Fame $5 Gold (0.2419 oz AGW) - $525 SHIPPED
Lot 14: 2014 Proof Baseball Hall of Fame $5 Gold (0.2419 oz AGW) - $505 SHIPPED
Lot 15: 1836 $2.50 Classic Head Gold - $410 SHIPPED (this coin has been cleaned, but if you want a really old USA gold coin, it's still a great buy)
Lot 16: 1986 California Grizzly Bear 1 oz Gold Round - SPOT + $90 SHIPPED
SOLD SOLD Lot 17: 1990 Australia $100 1 oz Gold Nugget - $2010 SHIPPED SOLD SOLD
SOLD SOLD Lot 18: 2014 1/4 oz Gold Libertad - $550 SHIPPED SOLD SOLD
Lot 19: 1994 "Royal Hawaiin Mint" 1/10 oz Gold Coin - $300
Lot 20: 1915 Austria 100 Corona Gold Coin (restrikes, 0.9802 AGW) - SPOT + $55 SHIPPED
Lot 21: 1906 Gold HALF Sovereign (.1178 AGW) - $235 SHIPPED
Lot 22: 2008 Proof Krugerrand Set - 1 oz Gold & 5 Rand Oom Paul Coin - $2300 SHIPPED
Lot 23: 2008 Natura Giants of Africa Elephant Set, 1 oz Proof Gold Coin + 24K Gold PLATED Sterling Silver Elephant Sculpture (4 grams) - $2100 SHIPPED
Lot 24: 2013 Britannia 5 Coin Silver Proof Set - $205 SHIPPED
Lot 25: Apollo 5 oz Silver Proof - $235 SHIPPED
Lot 26: 2009 1 oz Platinum Preamble Series - $1510 SHIPPED
I take responsibility for shipping. If tracking says it was delivered or that it was out for delivery (they sometimes forget to do final scan), I consider it delivered. If tracking says it got lost or package damaged and empty, I will reimburse you fully or give you the same product if possible.
Payment options in order of preference: BTC, Zelle, Venmo, PPGS+3%. PPGS will only be available to users with a lot of feedback. I'll be going to sleep soon so I will start going through my messages tomorrow morning.
Thanks for looking and please let me know if I am doing anything wrong or inadvisable.
submitted by KeepStackinSon to Pmsforsale [link] [comments]

Historical Price of Bitcoin (2010 - 2019) - YouTube Future Price Prediction of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies ... The Rise and Fall of Bitcoin Bitcoin Price Prediction by Experts (Long Term) Bitcoin Price History, July 2010 - Today

Bitcoin price: Current value vs. 2010 price. In 2010, one Bitcoin was worth a mere $0.003, meaning if you had $1, you could buy about 333 Bitcoins. If you had invested that $1 in Bitcoin, seven ... mo bitcoins mo problems — If you’d bought $1,000 of Bitcoin in 2010, you’d be worth $35M Price of Bitcoin has doubled in 2017, and other currencies have jumped even more. 07 – Bitcoin v0.3 is released. 11 – News of the latest release propagates to Slashdot, causing a large influx of bitcoin users. 12 – Bitcoin value begins rising rapidly, going from $0.008 to $0.08 over the next five days. 17 – Mt. Gox is established. 18 – ArtForz becomes one of the earliest GPU miners. August The first Bitcoin mining pool, Slush Pool, was announced in November 2010, and, by December 13, 2010, Satoshi Nakamoto had posted for the last time on BitcoinTalk.org. Justin O'Connell Bitcoin value history (comparison to US $) Date USD : 1 BTC Notes Jan 2009 – Mar 2010 basically none No exchanges or market, users were mainly cryptography fans who were sending bitcoins for hobby purposes representing low or no value. In March 2010, user "SmokeTooMuch" auctioned 10,000 BTC for $50 (cumulatively), but no buyer was found.

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Historical Price of Bitcoin (2010 - 2019) - YouTube

Bitcoin has risen from less than one penny in 2010 to a price of about $17,000 as I write this In 2017 alone, bitcoin's value has risen by more than 1,700%. ... 2:27 Bitcoin Kurs & Store of Value (Prognosen & Ausblick) 7:49 Bitcoin Verteilung Zentralisiert? 9:06 Bitcoin ETF & Futures 12:13 Bitcoin Adaption - Gehalt in BTC erhalten 14:13 Politik, Krisen ... Bitcoin Trader: http://successempires.com Learn the basics of trading and profiting from bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The global economy is currently ... A video on the future price of Bitcoin, and prediction of the value of cryptocurrency technology at large. I've included my favorite model, illustrating a de... This could be the reason why its value went from $0.01 in 2010 to over $11,000 in late 2017.

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